Login


Working together to improve the lives of people with brain impairment

  • Home
  • ASSBI Webinar - Rare and Unusual Syndromes

ASSBI Webinar - Rare and Unusual Syndromes

  • 12 Dec 2017
  • Your Desk

Registration


Registration is closed
 

Ms Sue Sloan “Managing challenging behaviours in community settings”Challenging behaviours are common sequelae of severe brain injury and adversely impact on long term outcomes, particularly reintegration into meaningful life roles. Despite this, there are few practical resources available to assist the clinician to manage such behaviours and their impact. This webinar provides an introduction to key principles that guide development of a positive behaviour support plan. Principles include interdisciplinary teamwork, adopting a proactive approach and the planned use of natural and logical consequences. The importance of embedding the behaviour plan within a program of everyday activity aimed at building skills to maximise life role participation will be emphasised. The clinical application of this approach will be illustrated with a case study.
Professor Eli Vakil “Long-term Outcome Following Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): Three-factor Cognitive Reserve Structure”Although numerous studies have employed various measures thought to reflect the Cognitive Reserve (CR) concept, empirical evidence for its construct validity is lacking. The first aim of this study was to identify key variables that constitute this construct in the context of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). The second was to evaluate the contribution of pre-morbid variables to long-term functioning following TBI. Eighty-nine participants with moderate-to-severe TBI were evaluated. We found a three-factor CR structure, consisting of pre-morbid intellectual functioning, leisure activity, and socioeconomic status. The predictive value of these factors for long-term outcome following TBI was evaluated. The results showed that TBI severity predicted cognitive, social, and daily functioning outcomes. Among the CR factors, pre-injury intellectual functioning predicted cognitive, occupational, social, emotional and daily functioning. Pre-injury leisure activity predicted cognitive, emotional and daily functioning, while socioeconomic status failed to predict any of these variables. Findings suggest that CR construct explains significant variance in TBI outcome, over and above the variance explained by injury severity.
Professor Beth Armstrong“Aboriginal Australians' experiences of brain injury and ways to move forward in providing culturally secure rehabilitation services”Stroke and traumatic brain injury occur more than twice as frequently in Aboriginal as in non-Aboriginal populations yet representation of Aboriginal people within rehabilitation services is low and long term outcomes for survivors are largely unknown. This webinar will provide an overview of the issues involved for both Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander peoples in accessing rehabilitation services and health providers in providing culturally secure, accessable services. The notion of cultural security will be unpacked, with ideas presented for improving service delivery models, and accessing and utilising culturally appropriate resources for assessment and treatment. These discussions will be informed by an overview of research in the area and the latest results from the Missing Voices project - the first comprehensive study in Australia addressing the extent and impact of stroke and TBI in Aboriginal communities.
Dr Valentina Lorenzetti “Addiction and the brain: what do we know?”Approximately 246 million people used an illicit drug yearly. Worryingly, one out of 10 drug users will end up developing problem substance use. This significant minority constitutes 27 million individuals who experience devastating consequences from substance use disorders and dependence. While there are substance-specific alterations of personality, cognitive and neural characteristics; there is emerging evidence for common alterations across addiction disorders regardless of the substance of choice. Who are the most vulnerable to develop addiction? History of trauma, genetic vulnerabilities, family history of use, personality traits, and other key factors emerge to predate the onset of addiction disorders. What goes wrong in the transition from recreational drug use to dependence? Neuroscientific models of addiction, supported by evidence from preclinical evidence and human neuroimaging studies, postulate that specific neuroadaptations drive this transition. This webinar will cover topics such as the epidemiology and the burden of the disease of addiction disorders, contemporary theories of addiction, neuroscientific evidence on cognitive, personality and neural alterations that predate and follow the onset of addiction disorders, and genetic factors that may confer vulnerability to develop addictive disorder.
A/Professor Grahame Simpson“Suicide prevention in acquired brain injury ”The webinar covers the latest research into the prevalence and risk factors for suicidal thoughts and behaviours after traumatic brain injury. Approaches to screening and suicide risk assessment will be outlined. The Window to Hope program, which has now been successfully tested in two RCTs, will also be described, along with a range of other clinical management strategies.
Professor Olivier Piquet “Neuroimaging in the dementias: what’s the catch?”Brain neuroimaging now forms an integral component in the diagnosis of dementia. This presentation will review recent advances in structural and functional neuroimaging and their applications to dementia diagnosis. Relevance, advantages and limitation of these procedures will be discussed.the 2017 Webinar Series flyer - Click Here!
Ms Sue Sloan “Managing challenging behaviours in community settings”Challenging behaviours are common sequelae of severe brain injury and adversely impact on long term outcomes, particularly reintegration into meaningful life roles. Despite this, there are few practical resources available to assist the clinician to manage such behaviours and their impact. This webinar provides an introduction to key principles that guide development of a positive behaviour support plan. Principles include interdisciplinary teamwork, adopting a proactive approach and the planned use of natural and logical consequences. The importance of embedding the behaviour plan within a program of everyday activity aimed at building skills to maximise life role participation will be emphasised. The clinical application of this approach will be illustrated with a case study.
Professor Eli Vakil “Long-term Outcome Following Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): Three-factor Cognitive Reserve Structure”Although numerous studies have employed various measures thought to reflect the Cognitive Reserve (CR) concept, empirical evidence for its construct validity is lacking. The first aim of this study was to identify key variables that constitute this construct in the context of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). The second was to evaluate the contribution of pre-morbid variables to long-term functioning following TBI. Eighty-nine participants with moderate-to-severe TBI were evaluated. We found a three-factor CR structure, consisting of pre-morbid intellectual functioning, leisure activity, and socioeconomic status. The predictive value of these factors for long-term outcome following TBI was evaluated. The results showed that TBI severity predicted cognitive, social, and daily functioning outcomes. Among the CR factors, pre-injury intellectual functioning predicted cognitive, occupational, social, emotional and daily functioning. Pre-injury leisure activity predicted cognitive, emotional and daily functioning, while socioeconomic status failed to predict any of these variables. Findings suggest that CR construct explains significant variance in TBI outcome, over and above the variance explained by injury severity.
Professor Beth Armstrong“Aboriginal Australians' experiences of brain injury and ways to move forward in providing culturally secure rehabilitation services”Stroke and traumatic brain injury occur more than twice as frequently in Aboriginal as in non-Aboriginal populations yet representation of Aboriginal people within rehabilitation services is low and long term outcomes for survivors are largely unknown. This webinar will provide an overview of the issues involved for both Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander peoples in accessing rehabilitation services and health providers in providing culturally secure, accessable services. The notion of cultural security will be unpacked, with ideas presented for improving service delivery models, and accessing and utilising culturally appropriate resources for assessment and treatment. These discussions will be informed by an overview of research in the area and the latest results from the Missing Voices project - the first comprehensive study in Australia addressing the extent and impact of stroke and TBI in Aboriginal communities.
Dr Valentina Lorenzetti “Addiction and the brain: what do we know?”Approximately 246 million people used an illicit drug yearly. Worryingly, one out of 10 drug users will end up developing problem substance use. This significant minority constitutes 27 million individuals who experience devastating consequences from substance use disorders and dependence. While there are substance-specific alterations of personality, cognitive and neural characteristics; there is emerging evidence for common alterations across addiction disorders regardless of the substance of choice. Who are the most vulnerable to develop addiction? History of trauma, genetic vulnerabilities, family history of use, personality traits, and other key factors emerge to predate the onset of addiction disorders. What goes wrong in the transition from recreational drug use to dependence? Neuroscientific models of addiction, supported by evidence from preclinical evidence and human neuroimaging studies, postulate that specific neuroadaptations drive this transition. This webinar will cover topics such as the epidemiology and the burden of the disease of addiction disorders, contemporary theories of addiction, neuroscientific evidence on cognitive, personality and neural alterations that predate and follow the onset of addiction disorders, and genetic factors that may confer vulnerability to develop addictive disorder.
A/Professor Grahame Simpson“Suicide prevention in acquired brain injury ”The webinar covers the latest research into the prevalence and risk factors for suicidal thoughts and behaviours after traumatic brain injury. Approaches to screening and suicide risk assessment will be outlined. The Window to Hope program, which has now been successfully tested in two RCTs, will also be described, along with a range of other clinical management strategies.
Professor Olivier Piquet “Neuroimaging in the dementias: what’s the catch?”Brain neuroimaging now forms an integral component in the diagnosis of dementia. This presentation will review recent advances in structural and functional neuroimaging and their applications to dementia diagnosis. Relevance, advantages and limitation of these procedures will be discussed.5 one-hour webinars will be run in April, June, August, October and December 2017. You can register for one, more than one or all 5.

REGISTER NOW


Webinar December 12th 2017 - Rare and Unusual Syndromes.

Neuropsychologists are familiar with many conditions (e.g., traumatic brain injury; stroke; dementia) that have well known cognitive sequelae. Sometimes, however, we need to assess patients with unusual diagnoses that we have not met before. Occasionally we might be asked to assess patients with conditions that are unfamiliar and which are generally regarded not to have neuropsychological consequences.


This webinar presents two patients with such unusual syndromes: the Alice in Wonderland Syndrome and Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome and discusses strategies that might be useful when assessing patients with rare and unusual syndromes.


REGISTER NOW


Contacts

e: admin@assbi.com.au
t: 0425 220622

PO Box 64, 
Randwick
NSW 2031
Australia

About the Society

Working together to improve the lives of people with brain impairment.

ASSBI is a multidisciplinary society dedicated to improving the quality of life of people with brain impairment and their families. 

Corporate Partners



Copyright © 2017 ASSBI
Website design: Advance Web Design
Privacy Policy | Terms of Use

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software